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Neckclothitania from wikipedia

Sewing pointy collar

  • Use smaller stitches near the points
  • Trace stitch lines onto fabric
  • Stitch only to the point, leave needle in, then turn fabric to continue sewing
  • Trim seam allowance and taper: never going closer than 1/8″
  • Grade seam allowance (cut one layer in closer than the other to reduce bulk).

Turning

  • Press flat after stitching, before turning.
  • Use a tool designed for turning collars. Don't press too hard to break stitching or make a hole.
  • Take "a needle threaded with thick thread and make a large knot in the end. Pass the needle through one layer of the fabric very close to the point and pull the needle out through the opening. Gently tug on the knot as you turn the collar right side out and the point should come out. Cut the thread close to the fabric and shake the knot out.
  • Use a straight pin to pick out point if necessary. Do carefully." from jenifersult.wordpress.com 2012/03/05 Making Perfect Points.

Types of detachable collars

  • Wing Collar: Popular around 1900. Collar tall, just tips in front bend down. Worn to White Tie affairs.
  • Eton Collar: Like school uniform for british school with same name, since 1800s.
  • Imperial Collar: Stands straight up 2-3 inches wide, does not fold down at all. Used for formal events during late Victorian/Edwardian periods.
  • Men often had a variety of collars they kept in a leather collar-box.
  • Detachable cuffs were held in place with cuff-studs. Two buttonholes at the tops of the cuffs were for the cuff-studs. The two other buttonholes further down existed for the use of cufflinks.
  • Arrow Collars from 1900-1930s. "Puttin' On the Ritz" style.
  • Earlier shirts where one size only. Men used sleeve-garters to hold sleeves in place while working.

Dress Shirts

  • made from plain linen, plain cotton or cotton piqué
  • Heavily starched bib front - designed to give impression of firm, flat torso. Stiff like cardboard. Held in place by extending under suspenders and ends just about trouser waist. Has one or two visible studs to hold in place.

  • The detachable collar should extend a minimum of three quarters of an inch above the coat collar.
  • Two studs hold collar in place. The shorter stud in back, the front one passes through fabric of shirt at throat. "Because of the shirt design, only the front stud touches the neck. Therefore, the flat back of this stud should be of bone or mother-of-pearl as metal may leave a mark on the skin. The extended portion of the stud is usually brass but is not seen as it is covered by either the bow tie at the front of the collar or by the bow tie band at the back. " blacktieguide.com
  • Wing-collared shirts lost poplularity after 1930, with introduction of the formal turndown shirt for the dinner jacket. Dinner jacket replaces tailcoat for eveningwear. blacktieguide.com
  • Shirt manufacturers began to attach the wing collar to their full-dress shirts in the 1960s. blacktieguide.com

"This most formal style of shirt takes stiff barrel cuffs (single cuffs in UK) which are intended to extend further beyond the coat sleeve than do the softer French-style double cuffs worn with a dinner jacket. Although they are not folded back, these cuffs are still fastened with links instead of buttons. They are made of plain linen or cotton or they can be in piqué to match the shirt’s bosom."

"Detachable collars are fastened to the tunic shirt with a shorter stud at the back of the collar and a longer one in front that can accommodate the overlap of fabric at the throat. Because of the shirt design, only the front stud touches the neck. Therefore, the flat back of this stud should be of bone or mother-of-pearl as metal may leave a mark on the skin. The extended portion of the stud is usually brass but is not seen as it is covered by either the bow tie at the front of the collar or by the bow tie band at the back."

See also

Instructions on tying Regency Neckcloths which describe how to tie all the variations shown in the image above. This is also a nice site filled with all sorts of details of the Regency Era: The times of Lord Byron, Jane Austen.
Related pages:

Last edited September 10, 2012 (history)
 
   

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